Blanding’s Turtles — How Can We Get Them Off of the Threatened Species List?

We’ve had Yertle and Bowser in our room over the past few months.  You’ve all enjoyed watching them grow and interact with one another.  We know they are getting larger and longer every week and are eating more and more.

But not all Blanding’s turtles are as lucky.  Please skim through these articles to find out why Blanding’s turtles are threatened.  Then answer the following questions for Friday:

1.  What are the major threats to the Blanding’s turtles?

2.  What do you think can be done to get the Blanding’s turtle off the Threatened Species list?

Blanding’s Turtles Trek for Life

Head Start for Turtles

Illinois Turtles Race Against Extinction

Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program

Conservation of Endangered Species in Canada:  Blanding’s Turtle Endangered Species Profile – Nature Canada

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133 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by ec15 on November 17, 2010 at 8:57 pm

    1. The main threats against Blanding’s turtles are crossing roads Blanding’s turtles cross roads 3-6 times and raccoons they will eat the eggs and alive.2. I think that if people started caring a bit more maybe that could help or if your driving and you see a turtle stop the car and try to save it.

    Reply

  2. Posted by EC13 on November 17, 2010 at 10:19 pm

    1.The main threats to the Blanding’s turtles is that they really travel a lot so, they have to cross highways and then they sometimes get driven by a car.And they also get eaten by raccoons and other predators which want to have a feast..
    2. I think if people could just be a little more careful and not run over turtles like that I think we will be able to save a great amount of turtles.

    Reply

  3. Posted by EC20 on November 17, 2010 at 10:23 pm

    1. One of the threats that Blanding’s Turtles face is when the female is going to lay her eggs she travels from her home to a new location which is typically far away. The female turtle is forced to encounter many man-made dangers to get to her nesting place. One of those dangers is traffic. While she is crossing the road, a car could hurt or even worse kill her. Another problem is that their habitats are being destroyed by people. So they have fewer places to live and fewer places to find food and breed.

    2.One way we can save the Species is we could get more people to start head-starting turtles. By doing that, more turtles will have the opportunity to grow up without the risk of man-made dangers. So that they will have the chance to be bigger and stronger when they are released. Another thing we can do is if we see a Blanding’s turtle is to contact a wildlife refuge and tell them where the turtle is and if it had a radio on its back.This will help researchers understand where the turtles are making their homes or give them the opportunity to track a new turtle.

    Reply

    • Posted by EC18 on November 17, 2010 at 10:41 pm

      I like how you mentioned many threats turtles have, instead of just one threat. Awesome job! 🙂

      Reply

    • Posted by ec12 on November 17, 2010 at 11:52 pm

      I typing mine up when your showed up great job!!

      Reply

    • Posted by ec11 on November 19, 2010 at 5:27 pm

      I think this had a lot of really great words and a lot of detail. Great job!

      Reply

    • Posted by Ec8,Ec21 on November 19, 2010 at 5:36 pm

      Great job ec 20!!!!!!!!!!

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:26 pm

      Dear EC20: How would you get more head-start programs out there? Mrs. E

      Reply

      • Posted by EC20 on November 23, 2010 at 12:45 am

        To get more head-start programs out there, I would educate people. I would accomplish this by doing the following:

        A. Put posters and information packets on bulletin boards at Libraries in the science section,
        schools, and visitor centers of a Wildlife Refuge that read something like:
        Save Blanding’s Turtles!
        Look for them on the road and
        if you see them, don’t run
        them over.

        B. Go to other schools and recreation centers and explain about the head-start
        program and how it will benefit the student’s learning while also saving this threatened species of turtles.

        C. Make a blog (like this awesome blog) where people can gather information
        about the Blanding’s turtles including what they can do if they ever come across a Blanding’s turtle, as well as respond to what they think about the turtles.

        D. Give a online presentation about head-starting turtles and
        make a new website for this presentation and/or put it on your blog.

      • Posted by EC20 on November 23, 2010 at 10:46 pm

        One additional thought I had to get more head-start programs out there is:

        Have a fundraiser! At the fundraiser you would teach people about the Blanding’s turtles by
        playing games that have something to do with the Blanding’s turtles, face paint turtles on kids faces, art projects which for example you could make Blanding’s turtle’s habitat out of a shoebox, and with the money you earn you could do a few things to help the turtles. One thing is have a couple herpetologists go out and look for some turtles to give to classes to create a head-start program. Two, you could pay for more tanks and other pieces of equipment that the turtles need.

    • Posted by ec19 on December 3, 2010 at 11:42 pm

      I like how you described everything!
      I like how you wrote so much about the crossing roads problem.

      Reply

    • Posted by EC21 on April 8, 2011 at 11:46 pm

      Great job

      Reply

  4. Posted by EC-8 on November 17, 2010 at 10:31 pm

    1) The major threats to Blanding’s turtles are animals such as foxes, raccoons, and many types of birds. However, fishing accidents, poachers, and vehicles smashing into turtles are threats from people.

    2) Some ways to get Blanding’s turtles off the Endangered Species list are to build fewer highways, stop building houses in their natural habitats, and by head starting more turtles.

    Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:28 pm

      Dear EC 8: How would you prevent people from building homes in the Blanding’s turtles’ habitats? Mrs. E

      Reply

      • Posted by EC-8 on November 22, 2010 at 10:13 pm

        My thought was to let people know about the issue, and how I can do that is by making signs, writing e-mails to local politicians, and post about it on environmental blogs.

  5. Posted by EC18 on November 17, 2010 at 11:39 pm

    1. These are some of the threats that make the Blanding’s turtles be on the Threatened Species list. The biggest threat to Blanding’s turtles is when they are laying their eggs and they travel to the place they want to lay it. Usually, this means they have to travel over busy roads, and take the chance of being ingured or even killed. In the wild, raccoons and skunks would love to snack on a Blanding’s turtle. People are always making roads, making houses, making highways, making stores, and making things. We are taking over the Blanding’s turtles habitats.
    2. We need to stop making all of this stuff and stop ruining their habitats. If you find a turtle on the road or a pathway filled with people, you should pick it up, and move it away from danger in the derection it was traveling in. You should also contact the wildlife people so that they can find the turtle and give it to a classroom to head-start. Head-starting turtles makes them nice and big by the time they go into the wild. Hopefully this will help take the turtles out of the Threatened Species list.

    Reply

    • Nice job EC18! 🙂

      Reply

    • Posted by ec11 on November 18, 2010 at 9:31 pm

      Great Job! Very well put!;)

      Reply

    • Posted by ec19 on November 18, 2010 at 10:26 pm

      Wow! you said a ton! great job!

      Reply

    • Posted by EC6 on November 19, 2010 at 1:28 am

      Great job, EC18! I like the way you filled your post with juicy words!

      Reply

    • Posted by ec19 on November 19, 2010 at 5:26 pm

      it must have taken you hours to write such a good entry!
      amazing!

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:29 pm

      Dear EC18: You talk about the turtles traveling over busy roads to lay their eggs and that many get hurt or killed. What are your ideas on making this a safer process for the Blanding’s turtles? Mrs. E

      Reply

      • Posted by EC18 on November 22, 2010 at 9:13 pm

        Maybe people could go out and track turtles and then they might know when they were making their journeys to find a spot to lay eggs. Maybe the people could then track them on a map and go help them cross roads so that they wouldn’t get hit or killed. Otherwise, we just have to be on a lookout for turtles crossing roads.

      • Posted by EC18 on November 23, 2010 at 8:44 pm

        I also think that people need to know that Blanding’s Turtles are endangered. They need to know that the turtles get killed half of the time. They need to know to stop and get the turtles to safety when they see them on the road. We also could make a ‘turtle crossing’ sign and put it up.

    • Posted by EC21 on April 8, 2011 at 11:46 pm

      Realy good!

      Reply

  6. Posted by ec12 on November 17, 2010 at 11:49 pm

    1) Foxes, raccoons, coyotes and skunks all ravage
    Nests eating eggs crushing the nests some other problems Blanings Turtes face are delvepment in wetlands which crushes nest, egges and Blanings Turtes also giving them less space to nest another problem is that poacher’s capture and sell on the black market.

    2) I think that we can help Blandings Turtles by opening wildlife reserves and fencing off nests.

    Reply

    • I think the “fencing off other wildlife” is a good idea EC12!

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:31 pm

      Dear EC12: You talked about fencing off the turtles’ nests. How would you find these nests and how would you go about getting materials to do this type of work? Mrs. E

      Reply

      • Posted by ec12 on November 24, 2010 at 12:48 am

        1) I think that turtes lay eggs in the same spot ever year so about the time that the turtes stop
        laying there eggs we fence of those spots.

        2) I though that we could use wire mesh for fencing off nests.

  7. 1. One of the turtles problem is cars and trucks running over them. And another threat is Raccoons and other predators that might eat the turtles.
    2.I think people should be watching more and stop when they see wildlife and let the wildlife pass. and also I think that every school should give at least 8 Blanding’s a head start.

    Reply

    • Posted by EC6 on November 19, 2010 at 1:23 am

      Your post is 4 sentences long, but it gives you all the information you need. Great job!

      Reply

    • Posted by ec19 on November 19, 2010 at 5:11 pm

      I think you could think of more major threats to Blanding’s turtles
      But everything else is great!

      Reply

    • Posted by ec14 on November 19, 2010 at 5:16 pm

      I think each school should give at least 8 turtles a head start;)

      Reply

    • Posted by ec1 on November 19, 2010 at 5:21 pm

      Great job ec 5! I like your thinking of every school should give 8 turtles a head start!

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:32 pm

      Dear EC5: Why do you think head-starting turtles is important? What have you learned by doing this in our classroom? Mrs. E

      Reply

      • Posted by E-4 5 on November 22, 2010 at 9:08 pm

        I think that head starting is a good because the head started turtle will have a hard shell, sharp claws to protect him/her and so on and so on. I learned that if you head start a turtle it will have lower chances of getting eaten, getting killed and stuff like that but it can’t protect himself or herself from trucks and cars, but it good that 70% less getting eaten.

  8. 1. The major threats are roads, Blanding’s turtles do a lot of traveling to lay eggs and to find a new place to live if the place that their house was to be made into a road.
    2. I think that we can help by stopping the car to help a turtle or other animal to cross the road safely.

    Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:34 pm

      Dear EC3: What would you do to make the roads safer for the Blanding’s turtles to cross so that they can lay their eggs and look for new homes? Mrs. E

      Reply

      • I think the ways I can make the road safer for Blandings turtle to cross by making a turtle crosswalk with crossing signs and a crossing guard. My other idea is to change the road to a bike path, creating an awareness of turtle crossing the area.

  9. Posted by EC4 on November 18, 2010 at 9:12 pm

    The major threats to the Blanding’s Turtles are…
    1.) They cross rivers
    2.) They cross busy streets
    3.) They wander around at night
    4.) They can get eaten when they are little because they have a soft shell when they are born
    5.) There might be more boys than girls so they won’t have babies

    The way I think we can help them is…
    We can put all of the turtles that we find in Concord in a fenced-in place at Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (G.M.N.W.R.) and the people that work there can take care of them.

    Reply

    • Posted by ec19 on November 18, 2010 at 10:24 pm

      Great job!
      But I don’t think that all of the turtles can fit in Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge.

      Reply

    • Posted by EC7 on November 19, 2010 at 2:21 am

      I like how you named a lot of the turtle places where they could get killed.

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:35 pm

      Dear EC4: I’d love to hear more about your idea of making a Blanding’s turtle refuge at Great Meadows National WIldlife Refuge. What ideas do you have about doing this? Mrs. E

      Reply

      • I think that maybe if someone finds a Blanding’s Turtle (in danger) they could try to take care of it and then get it to G.M. as soon as they can. I also think that if the turtle has a radio they should keep in in G.M. but not with all of the other turtles. There could be a place that they watch them and make sure they are safe.

  10. 1. The major threats are raccoons and foxes and animals like that are around when the turtles are little because their shells are soft so animals can eat them.
    Also, When they cross busy roads and when the mothers lay their eggs.

    2. I think some drivers might need to be a little more careful when they’re driving. Also, we should find a wildlife refuge and put them all in there and start fencing of places for them. We would probably get them off the threatened species list.

    Reply

  11. Posted by ec11 on November 18, 2010 at 9:55 pm

    1) The Blandings turtles are on the threatened spiecies list. Sometimes the water that they swim in is poluted and they get sick and die. Another thing that happens is that the lay their eggs near people’s houses and the eggs get harnmed and they die in the egg. Probobaly the most comon is that people are cutting into the natural wold by making roads and neighborhoods, housing, buisnes, and schools, and even things like cars. A lot of the time trash hurts Blandings turtles because sometimes they eat it and again they get sick and die.
    2) Here are some ways you can help:

    1) Pick up our trash and other people’s trash if you can
    2) Don’t drop anything bad into the water if there is any tipe of wildlife living there
    3) If you ever find a turtle, never keep it as a pet because your jerms might get it sick and you may not know what kind of turte it is
    4) If you see a turtle in a place it is not supose to be, try and put it in a place that it is supose to be.
    5) Also, try and learn a little bit mre about Blandings turtles if you can
    I hope you try and help the Blandings turtles!

    Reply

    • Posted by Ec8,Ec21 on November 19, 2010 at 5:29 pm

      Great job ec 11!!!!!

      Reply

    • Posted by ec19 on November 19, 2010 at 5:37 pm

      nice!
      great job!
      you thought of a lot of ideas!
      I like how you added, “I hope you try and help the Blanding’s turtles!” at the end.
      I really liiked your entry!
      if I didn’t know a lot about Blanding’s turtles, your entry would have taught me a lot!

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:39 pm

      Dear EC11: What ideas do you have about trying to get people to learn more about the Blanding’s turtles? What ways could be used to accomplish this? Mrs. E.

      Reply

      • Posted by ec11 on November 22, 2010 at 10:39 pm

        Some ways you can learn more about Blandings turtles are:
        – You can go to Great Meadows Wildlife Refuge ( G.M.W.R).
        – You can go to our class blog.
        – You can go online and see some things that other people are doing to help Blandings turtles.
        There are lots of ways you can learn more about Blandings turtles and how you can save them.

    • Posted by ec19 on November 22, 2010 at 11:01 pm

      I like how you said “You can go to our classes blog”.
      I do that all the time!
      Our blog can teach you a lot about turtles!

      Reply

  12. Posted by ec19 on November 18, 2010 at 10:19 pm

    1. One of the threats for Blanding’s turtles is their habitat is disappearing because of people ‘s buildings and other construction. Another threat is that a lot of them get hit by cars. They also have to avoid a ton of predators which can be skunks, foxes, coyotes and raccoons. Which can be difficult. They have to worry about being eaten them and their eggs being eaten which happens a lot. They also have to watch out for farming equipment. When traveling long distances they have a very high chance of running into all of those problems.
    2. One of the ways that I think will probably help Blanding’s get off of the threatened species list is that we head start more and more Blanding’s turtles. I think we could also make sure that we don’t drive over any turtles when we are driving. Maybe if humans can stop making more buildings, roads and other construction in the turtle’s habitats it would help. And if we build cages around their nests to prevent their eggs from being eaten it will help.

    Reply

    • Posted by ec17 on November 19, 2010 at 5:21 pm

      I like the way you use” juicy” words.

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:41 pm

      Dear EC19: You have lots of good ideas. How do you think we can prevent turtles from being killed in the roads? Why do you think head-starting is a good idea? Mrs. E.

      Reply

      • Posted by ec19 on November 22, 2010 at 10:55 pm

        1. I think that we can prevent Blanding’s turtles from being killed on roads by telling people to be more careful when they are driving so they don’t run over animals. Or we can put our hand out when we’re driving to somebody going the other direction about to run over a Blanding’s Turtle. Or we can just be careful and make sure that we don’t run over a Blanding’s Turtle when we are driving. Or we can just spread the word to everyone.

        2. I think that head-starting the Blanding’s turtles is a good idea because, if we head-start them they will get bigger and stronger and when they get bigger and stronger they have a better chance of surviving and when they have a better chance of surviving it is more likely that they will reproduce or have babies and our goal is to have more baby Blanding’s Turtles and get them off of the threatened species list.

  13. Blanding’s turtles are turtles on the endangered list.
    What makes them an endangered spiecies?
    1) Animals such as raccoons, minks, foxes and more eat them. Even some of us humans can kill them by running over them, eating them and even putting trash on the ground can hurt them. Also if the water is too cold then it can make them sick and they might as well die.
    How can we help?

    2) 1- A way we can help is to build a small fence around the nest for animals to keep out.
    2- Keep out trash out os the water as well as the land
    3- If you see a turtle on the road crossing slow down the car and wait for it no matter how slow it takes.
    I hope you can help.

    Reply

    • Posted by ec11 on November 19, 2010 at 5:19 pm

      Great job! I think you could add a little bit more detail but besides that, it’s great!

      Reply

    • Posted by ec17 on November 19, 2010 at 5:26 pm

      I like the part when you said we should keep trash out of the water and off the land!

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:42 pm

      Dear EC7: How do you think the trash might effect the Blanding’s turtles? What was mentioned about trash in the articles you read Mrs. E.

      Reply

      • I have a couple ideas that probably weren’t from the articles.

        1) There might be an oil in the trash that would effect the turtles.

        2) The trash may have sharp points that could give the turtles really bad cuts.

        3) The trash might be poisoned and if the turtles eat the trash they could die from the trash.

        Those are some reasons why the trash could effect the turtles.

  14. 1.The major threats to blandings turtles are mostly animals like racoons,foxes,skunks, and many types of birds.But the threats aren’t just animals, people and cars too are threats to blandings turtles. Many blandings turtles die by getting run over by a car.

    2.I think to get blandings turtle off the endangered list we shoud be more careful when driving a car and we shouldn’t destroy their habitats. We should also not throw trash into the rivers. We could also make a wall around their nest so other animals can’t destroy their nest or eat the turtles.

    Reply

    • Posted by ec11 on November 19, 2010 at 5:33 pm

      Nice job but I think you could add a little bit more detail!

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:44 pm

      Dear EC1: You talked about how many of the turtles die from getting run over by a car. What ways can you think of that may prevent this from happening? Mrs. E.

      Reply

      • Dear Mrs. Erickson
        I think we should make turtle crossing signs or make stop sign on roads that are near a turtle nest.

    • Posted by EC5 on November 26, 2010 at 2:31 pm

      I agree that people should not destroy their habitat.
      And I like your idea of putting a wall around their nests.

      Reply

  15. 1.Some major threats to Blanding’s Turtles are, Raccoons. Raccoons invade Blanding’s Turtles nests and eat the Blanding’s Turtles inside the nest. Raccoons even know when nesting season is. Mink. The Mink also invades the turtle nests and eats the turtles . I do not know if Minks knows when nesting season is. Foxes. Foxes also invade nests and eat the turtles. I also do not know if Foxes know when nesting season is. Skunk. The Skunk also invades nests and eats the turtles. Coyotes. Coyotes also invade nests and eat the turtles. The Nest. Sometimes the nest the turtles are in are to cold and the turtles freeze. Humans. Humans kill Blanding’s turtles in many different ways. One of them is running over them. When turtles cross the road humans run over them in cars. Another way is destroying their habitats. Turtles can die from not having enough food if their habitat is gone.

    2. Some ways we can save Blanding’s Turtles are, saving their nests. A lot of the time Blanding’s Turtles die in their nest. If we protect their nest they will at least have a chance at surviving. Make people more aware of themselves. If people were more aware of themselves they wouldn’t run over turtles with their car. Keeping them and protecting them. If we do more of what we do in our classroom. Then the Blanding’s turtles would have a better chance of surviving.

    Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 1:35 am

      I like your suggestion of making people more aware of the Blanding’s turtles. Do you have any ideas on how to do this? Mrs. E

      Reply

      • Posted by ec9 on November 23, 2010 at 2:01 am

        Dear Mrs.E, My ideas for making people more aware of Blanding’s Turtles are: 1. Telling people they will be fined if they run over a Blanding’s Turtle. 2. Writing a article in the paper about the importance of Blanding’s Turtles. 3. Handing out fliers about protecting Blanding’s Turtles to people in Concord.

        These are some ways to notify people to protect Blanding’s Turtles.

        From EC9

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:46 pm

      Dear EC9: You have done a good job describing some of the predators of Blanding’s turtles and how they eat turtle eggs. Describe some specific ways that we could protect the turtle nests and the hatchlings from these predators. Mrs. E.

      Reply

      • Posted by ec9 on November 23, 2010 at 2:15 am

        Dear Mrs.E, My ideas for protecting Blanding’s Turtle nests are; 1.Making fences around the nests so the predators can’t eat the turtles. 2.Getting rid of predators of the Blanding’s Turtle if you know you have a nest in your yard. 3.If you know you have a nests in your yard then stay outside more so the predators won’t come in your yard.

        These are some ways to protect Blanding’s Turtles nests.

        From EC9

  16. Posted by EC10 on November 19, 2010 at 1:03 am

    The major threats of the blandings turtles are…
    they have to cross roads to get to some places and they could get run over by a car or a truck or they could get eaten by raccoons, foxes and other wild animals.

    I think that we could help the blandings turtles by…
    fencing in their nests if we find any of their nests near our houses. We can stop when we see turtles walking across the roads and not put any trash in ponds or lakes that they could be in because it could get them sick.

    Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:47 pm

      Dear EC10: You talked about how the turtles are getting run over. What are some of your thoughts on how drivers of cars and trucks can be alerted to the turtles’ crossing the roads? Mrs. E

      Reply

  17. Posted by ec21 on November 19, 2010 at 1:07 am

    Two of threats that turtles face are cars and raccoons.

    We can help turtles by making more turtle crossing signs. We can also keep turtles from raccoons.

    we can help by making

    Reply

  18. Posted by EC2 on November 19, 2010 at 1:19 am

    1. Some of the major threats to Blanding’s turtles are predators such as, foxes, chipmunks, raccoons, skunks, minks and coyotes.
    Humans are a very big threat too; they destroy the habitats to build houses and roads.
    Another big threat are highways, turtles can get run over when they’re looking for mates or looking for a place to lay their eggs.

    2. Several ways we can save the turtles from extinction are to reserve places for the turtles like Great Meadows, to wait for them to cross the road when you’re in your car, and to make sure that none of the predators get to the nests. I hope you try and help save the Blanding’s too, to get them off the endangered species list.

    Reply

    • Posted by ec11 on November 19, 2010 at 5:15 pm

      Nice job! Very well said and a lot of good detail!

      Reply

    • Posted by ec1 on November 19, 2010 at 5:25 pm

      Great job ec2! Yours has a really big list of predators

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:50 pm

      Dear EC2: Can you describe some specific ways to help build nests? What would you use and how do you think we would know where they are? Mrs. E.

      Reply

      • Riveredge, we can’t build the nests only the turtles can do that, but we can build fences around the nests maybe made of stakes and really strong ropes.
        But we could only do it for a few of them if Dr. Windmiller even lets us use the tracking devices to find out where the turtles laid their eggs.
        Thanks for the pointer I’ll try to make it more clear the next time. EC2

  19. Posted by ec17 on November 19, 2010 at 1:50 am

    EC 17

    1) The major threats on the Blanding’s turtles are
    • When they are still in their eggs they are at risk for being eaten by animals such as raccoons, chipmunks, and more.
    • The wetland that the Blanding’s turtles live is being less available.
    • Car and fishing accidents have also caused the turtle population to go down.

    2) The ways we can get the Blanding’s turtles off the threatened species list is
    • The classrooms can keep having Blanding’s turtles and other schools can start doing it too.
    • We can put small fences around the nest of turtles to keep wild animal that call them a snack away.
    • Try to use a canoe or a kayak instead of a motor boat so the water stays clean for the turtles.

    Reply

    • Posted by ec19 on November 19, 2010 at 5:21 pm

      Great job!

      you thuoght of so many things!

      Reply

    • Posted by ec1 on November 19, 2010 at 5:32 pm

      Great job ec17! Yours has alot of information!

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:52 pm

      Dear EC17: You have lots of good ideas on how to protect the Blanding’s turtles. Why do you think head-starting the turtles is a good idea? How would you get more schools involved in this project? Mrs. E

      Reply

      • Posted by ec17 on November 24, 2010 at 3:23 pm

        1. I think head starting the turtles would be a good idea because when you have them their shell will get hard. they can can protect them self better in the wild.

        2. How we can get other schools to do this we can have the Concord school people email other towns about this turtle project. We can also put it up on the blog.

  20. Posted by ec14 on November 19, 2010 at 2:05 am

    Some of the predators to Blanding’s turtles and turtle eggs are skunks, raccoons, minks, chipmunks and birds.

    Other major threats to the Blanding’s turtles are fishing accidents, cars, poachers, and their habitats are getting dried up. There are a couple different reasons turtles are getting killed by cars. Some people catch the turtles and bring them home as pets and then turtles have to walk home a far distance and across many roads. They also sometimes get run over looking for mates.

    Here are a couple things that we can do to help get the Blanding’s turtles off the Threatened Species list.
    1) Head start program for turtles. There is a program that raises the Blanding’s turtles in captivity for 1-2 years when his or her shell is hard enough to deter predators. Then they let them go.
    2) Restore wetlands.
    3) Moves turtles out of the middle of the road.
    4) Don’t feed predators near your house.
    5) Don’t leave your pet outside during nesting season unattended.
    6) Increase law enforcement to protect turtles from poachers.

    Reply

    • Posted by ec11 on November 19, 2010 at 5:36 pm

      Great job! I think that people should increase the law to protect turtles from poachers too.

      Reply

    • Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 5:55 pm

      Dear EC14: You have lots of great ideas and thoughts here. Can you tell us some more about the head-start program that keeps the turtles for one to two years? Where is that program and do you think that would be better than keeping them for nine months like we are and why? Mrs. E.

      Reply

      • Posted by ec14 on November 23, 2010 at 12:31 am

        The program is located in Illinois.
        It is also feeds the turtles individually so the big turtles get a lot and the little turtles get a little bit.
        I think that the program is a little bit better than us because they have more experience than us and they are a company

  21. Posted by ec19 on November 19, 2010 at 5:19 pm

    great job!

    I liked how you thought of so many things!

    Reply

  22. Posted by riveredge on November 20, 2010 at 1:38 am

    You all have raised lots of great questions about how to protect the turtles. I loved also how you were responding to one another. You have become true bloggers as well as stewards of the environment. I’m proud to be your teacher!

    Reply

  23. Posted by riveredge on November 22, 2010 at 1:58 pm

    EC6: 1) Some things that threaten the Blanding’s species is the fact that they travel so much. Well, you might be asking yourself “what’s wrong with traveling?” Nothing. yes, you heard me, folks. I said nothing. N-O-T-H-I-N-G. Nothing. It’s the fact that they cross roads to get to almost anywhere that is inhabited by humans. You might think humans are all innocent. Well, sorry to break it to you, but we are NOT! We have made so many threats to the turtles like: roads, cars, and the fact that both are increasing. So now do you get we are NOT innocent! But humans are not all. Minks and herons see a meal where we see a turtle. And sometimes there’s a furry little masked bandit, looking for a tasty morsel or a midnight snack…

    2) One way we can help Blanding’s turtles is to persuade more people to head-start turtles. If more people can head-start lucky turtles like Yertle and Bowser, the species will jump off the threatened list. But some people can get careless when driving and-KERSPLAT! Well, that is not a good sound. If you see a turtle on the road and stop, pick it up, and return it to the side of the road it was going to. Well, I’ve got to go. See a turtle trying to cross the street. Okay, I don’t see a turtle. But I’ve still got to go. So, bye-FOR NOW.

    Reply

  24. Posted by riveredge on November 22, 2010 at 2:17 pm

    Dear EC6: You have a lot of good ideas here. I’m interested in knowing how we can get more head-start programs going? What did you learn about other head-start programs in the articles that you read? Mrs. E.

    Reply

    • Question: I’m interested in knowing how we can get more head-start programs going? What did you learn about other head-start programs in the articles that you read?

      Answer: We can launch more head-start programs by opening more people’s eyes to the severe danger the Blanding’s turtle species is in. If you don’t know about how to help the turtles, you can’t do anything to make things better for them.

      In other places like in Canada, (two places: Nova Scotia and Great Lakes/St. Lawrence (Ontario and Québec), DuPage County Forest Preserves, and other states like Ohio, Nebraska, Missouri, Maine, New Hampshire, Michigan, and New York, Blanding’s turtles live. In Nova Scotia, volunteers help to protect nests and researchers are rearing hatchlings in areas where the population of Blanding’s Turtles is growing smaller. In Ontario, there are people making many education and outreach programs, but no action plan for species protection and recovery exists. In Illinois, people are capturing female turtles and incubating their eggs-2/3 of them at a warmer temperature, as to make more females. As for the other places, I’m not sure of what they do to help head-start Blanding’s turtles.

      Reply

  25. Blanding’s turtles and their habitat are in immediate danger in Ontario, Canada.
    http://southshoreconservancy.wordpress.com/2011/05/12/ebr-request-to-kill-endangered-species/
    Can you help? Please contact us at southshoreconservancy@kos.net if you would like to send us a letter about why Blanding’s turtles deserve to be saved. We will forward it to the Ministry of Natural Resources. Thank you!

    Reply

  26. Yes and thanks for your help. Direct your comments by June 9, 2011 to Paula Norlock, Agreement Specialist
    Ministry of Natural Resources Policy Division at esa.permits.agreements@ontario.ca and quote ER number 011-3181 in the subject line. It’s hard to believe the government wants to give developers a licence to kill, but every voice counts!

    Reply

  27. If you like, you could mail a letter, but JUne 9th is the deadline. Paula Norlock
    Agreement Specialist
    Ministry of Natural Resources
    Policy Division
    Species at Risk Branch
    300 Water Street
    Floor 2
    Robinson Place South Tower
    Peterborough Ontario
    K9J 8M5
    Phone: (705) 755-1788
    Fax: (705) 755-5483

    I’ll let you know what happens.

    Reply

  28. Posted by GTO on June 9, 2011 at 3:29 pm

    Hello, I have had blanding’s turtles all my life. I love them. they are pretty common were I live. Each year we are visited by an old, old blanding’s turtle. she lays eggs in or driveway, so we have to take the eggs, and incubate them. the process takes awhile, but sooner or later they hatch, and we carefully take them out side and let them go (keep in mind we live way back in the country) last year, I kept one turtle. I figured that it was the weakest of all the turtles, and wouldn’t survive long, so I kept him and took care of him. I am glad I did to. last year about right after I decided to keep that turtle (bud) We went to school, and on the road was a smashed blanding’s turtle. the one that came to our house every year. I really didn’t realize how attached I was to the turtle. I just expected it to come each year. well, the point of me telling you all this, is that I want to do something that will protect these incredible creatures. is there some were near Chelsea, MI that I can help protect?

    Reply

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